DEA Offers New Prescription Drug Return Policy

3 Indest-2009-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Looking to improve the prescription drug abuse epidemic in the United States, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) announced September 8, 2014, that it would permit patients to return their unused prescription medications to pharmacies. This new rule, covering all types of prescription drugs, will give patients the option of mailing unused prescriptions to an authorized collector using packaging provided by the pharmacy.

Hopefully this will help to eliminate many of the problematic situations that pharmacists and physicians found themselves in when they accumulated returned or unused medications from patients for destruction.

This move intends to address the rising number of injuries and deaths associated with controlled substance drugs, particularly opioids. Reducing the stockpile of unneeded prescription drugs from American homes will limit teenagers’ accessibility to their parents’ medications and reduce burglaries for such substances. According to The New York Times, this demographic is known to be the most prevalent abuser of such controlled substances.

To read the full story from The New York Times, click here.

Prior Methods of Prescription Drug Disposal.

Under the Controlled Substances Act, patients were only allowed to dispose of unused drugs themselves or surrender them to law enforcement. Personal disposal of controlled substances typically means flushing pills down a toilet or throwing them in the trash. Because this can pose a risk toward animals and clean drinking water, these methods are frowned upon by environmentalists and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Drug “take back” programs are another option when it comes to disposing of unused prescription drugs. These events are organized by the DEA and are held twice a year at local police departments across the country. During these programs, citizens can anonymously drop off any unused prescription drugs. According to The Wall Street Journal, the Department of Justice (DOJ) reported that a nationwide event in April 2014 brought in 390 tons of prescription drugs at more than 6,000 sites. In the past four years, these collection events have removed from circulation more than 4.1 million pounds of prescription medication from across the country.

Although these events prove successful, many healthcare professionals are optimistic for the bigger impact the pharmacy “take back” programs may have. Providing consumers convenient year-round access to medication disposals will be positive reinforcement to regularly dispose of unused prescription medications. This method is believed to be more likely to accomplish the mission of shrinking the pool of unused and potentially fatal controlled substances in American homes.

To read the full article from The Wall Street Journal, click here.

Ironing Out Details of the New Plan.

There are many logistics to consider to ensure these pharmaceutical “take back” programs will be successful. The programs will not be mandatory, as the decision to take part will be the under the sole discretion of each company. The pharmacies must voluntarily choose to register with the DEA in order to start receiving the leftover prescriptions. In the past, pharmacies have not generally wanted to accept the hassle of offering such a program. However, the DEA expects many pharmacies to jump on the bandwagon to showcase good-faith effort of keeping drugs out of the wrong hands.

DEA-approved organizations collecting the unused drugs will include hospital pharmacies, narcotic treatment programs, and companies contracted by other collectors to destroy controlled substances.

There are concerns circling the initiative. Some pharmacies do not have the resources required to accommodate incinerators, thus limiting the locations available to consumers. In addition, professionals are concerned with the lack of regulations listed in the new plan. There are no set requirements on how the prescriptions should be destroyed. The rules simply mandate that the drugs are altered into a permanent, irreversible state.

The burden of payment has also not been discussed or outlined in the new plan. Who will cover the cost of packaging and disposal has yet to be decided. Also, to be considered is the challenge of keeping the returned prescriptions safe until destruction. An unsecured, unmonitored return site containing stock piles of addictive drugs would be a gold mine for many addicts and criminals. Should a theft occur at one of these drop-off receptacles, who would be held liable? The American Pharmacists Association has already expressed concern of pharmacy legal liability.

The biggest obstacle of all, however, may be convincing the general public that returning unused pills is a necessary moral obligation.

Comments?

Would you participate in this type of prescription drug return program? As a pharmacist or someone who works at a pharmacy, what are your concerns with this take back program? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Consult With A Health Law Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Pharmacists and Pharmacies.

We routinely provide deposition coverage to pharmacists, pharmacies and other health professionals being deposed in criminal cases, negligence cases, civil cases or disciplinary cases involving other health professionals. We can review business referral arrangements and provide legal counsel on whether they are not in violation of federal and state anti-referral laws. The lawyers of The Health Law Firm are experienced in both formal and informal administrative hearings and in representing physicians, physician assistants and other health professionals in investigations and at Board of Pharmacy hearings.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Barrett, Devlin. “U.S. to Allow Pharmacies to Take Back Unused Prescription Drugs.” The Wall Street Journal. (September 08, 2014). From: http://online.wsj.com/articles/u-s-to-allow-pharmacies-to-take-back-unused-prescription-drugs-1410186602

Saint Louis, Catherine. “D.E.A. to Allow Return of Unused Pills to Pharmacies.” The New York Times. (September 08, 2014). From: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/09/health/unused-pills-return-to-pharmacies.html?_r=0

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

OIG Issues Advisory Opinion to Specialty Pharmacy for Support Service Payments

LLA Headshot smBy Lenis L. Archer, J.D., M.P.H., The Health Law Firm

There is an inherent risk in entering into financial arrangements where payments to a service provider are only made when a referral is generated. On August 15, 2014, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) made this perfectly clear in an unfavorable advisory opinion issued to a specialty pharmacy that wanted to pay local retail pharmacies for providing support services to it.

Background of Request for OIG Advisory Opinion.

According to the OIG, the requestor, a specialty pharmacy, dispenses specialty pharmaceuticals used to treat a variety of chronic and life-threatening illnesses. The specialty pharmacy stated that the drugs offered at its establishment are frequently unavailable to retail pharmacies. In light of this, the specialty pharmacy asked whether it would be permissible to enter into agreements with various local pharmacies in which the specialty pharmacy would provide its specialty drug prescriptions to local pharmacies’ patients. Under the proposed contractual arrangement, the local pharmacies would be required to provide various support services, including:

1. Accepting the prescription from the patient or prescriber;
2. Gathering patient and prescriber demographic information;
3. Recording patient-specific history and use, including drug names, strength and directions;
4. Patient counseling;
5. Informing the patients about access to specialty drugs, including the availability from pharmacies other than the specialty pharmacy;
6. Obtaining patient consent to forward the prescription to the specialty pharmacy;
7. Transferring prescription information to the specialty pharmacy; and
8. Providing ongoing patient assessments for subsequent refills.

The retail pharmacies would be paid a “per-fill fee” by the specialty pharmacy at the time that the initial prescription was transmitted and upon each subsequent refill.

OIG Issued Negative Opinion Due to Anti-Kickback Statute.

The OIG issued an unfavorable opinion for this proposed agreement, concluding that the federal Anti-Kickback Statute was implicated because the specialty pharmacy would pay a per-fill fee for support services each time a local pharmacy referred a specialty drug prescription. After evaluating the arrangement, the OIG concluded that the per-fill fees were inherently subject to abuse because they were paid only when the support services provided by the retail pharmacy resulted in a referral to the specialty pharmacy. Thus, the OIG found that such a per-fill fee is directly linked to business generated by the local pharmacy for the specialty pharmacy, and could influence the local pharmacy’s referral decisions. OIG noted that the Anti-Kickback Statute is implicated if one purpose of the remuneration is to generate referrals.

Click here to read OIG Advisory Opinion No. 14-06.

Exceptions to Anti-Kickback Laws.

Like many other regulatory frameworks, the Anti-Kickback Statute has exceptions. The law provides a number of safe harbors to the rule which allow otherwise impermissible referral arrangements to pass muster.

Because the exceptions are numerous and often subject to change, it is highly recommended that any new business arrangement, or substantial change to an existing one, is reviewed by a health law attorney experienced in the area of Anti-Referral and Anti-Kickback Laws.

Consult With A Health Law Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Pharmacists and Pharmacies.

We routinely provide deposition coverage to pharmacists, pharmacies and other health professionals being deposed in criminal cases, negligence cases, civil cases or disciplinary cases involving other health professionals.

We can review business referral arrangements and provide legal counsel on whether they are not in violation of federal and state anti-referral laws.

The lawyers of The Health Law Firm are experienced in both formal and informal administrative hearings and in representing physicians, physician assistants and other health professionals in investigations and at Board of Pharmacy hearings. Call now or visit our website http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General. “OIG Advisory Opinion No. 14-06″ (August 15, 2014). From: https://oig.hhs.gov/fraud/docs/advisoryopinions/2014/AdvOpn14-06.pdf

Ciesla, Frank, Christian, Beth, and Burd, Ari. “Office of Inspector General (OIG) Issues Unfavorable Advisory Opinion to Specialty Pharmacy for Support Service Payments.” The National Law Review. (August 18, 2014). From: http://www.natlawreview.com/article/office-inspector-general-oig-issues-unfavorable-advisory-opinion-to-specialty-pharma

About the Author: Lenis L. Archer is as attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. http://www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Need Last Minute Deposition or Hearing Representation? Call The Health Law Firm

9 Indest-2008-6By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Our office often takes phone calls from pharmacies and pharmacists needing short-notice representation at a Board of Pharmacy hearing or at a deposition related to a health care matter.

In our experience, many other law firms refuse to represent clients at a hearings unless the firm is given plenty of advance notice. We always prefer to have sufficient time to obtain documents, review files, interview witnesses, conduct research and prepare, in order to provide the best possible representation to our client. However, we realize that in certain cases, the alternative is that the client either gets legal representation on little or no advance notice, or has to suffer the consequences of having no legal representation.

Be Aware that Administrative Proceedings Can be Complex.

In some cases individuals may be fooled into believing that they can effectively represent themselves. They later find out that they have gotten in over their heads. Laypersons (meaning, in this case, nonlawyers) who are not aware of such complex matters as the Administrative Procedure Act, the Rules of Civil Procedure, the Rules of Evidence, the Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.) Rules which the Board of Pharmacy and the Department of Health (DOH) have enacted, may quickly be confused.

The inexperienced individual, or even the inexperienced attorney, in these matters can fall into a number of procedural traps that damage an effective defense. This can be advising the individual to talk to the DOH investigator, filing an unnecessary answer to an Administrative Complaint, forgetting or not knowing that the client’s right to be free of self-incrimination applies in this type of case and many, many others.

Procedural Mistakes Can Be Damaging To Your Defense.

Often you will find that merely having an experienced attorney to represent you at a hearing or Board meeting will assist you in avoiding mistakes that damage your case and assist you in preserving your rights for an appeal. In other cases it may even be possible to obtain a change in forum to obtain a better result. For example, many laypersons do not know that if you elect an informal hearing before the Board of Pharmacy, you have waived your right to prove you are innocent by contesting the facts alleged against you.

What few know or think of in the heat of the moment is that you can ask at the informal hearing before the Board of Pharmacy to contest the facts, to prove you are not guilty of the charges, and to have the hearing converted to a formal hearing. A formal hearing will be in front of a neutral Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), and you have a great many more procedural rights than you have at an informal hearing. However, we still recommend that you have an experienced health lawyer represent you at a formal hearing.

Professional Liability Insurance May Pay Legal Fees for Deposition Coverage.

If you are a pharmacist or pharmacy that has professional liability insurance, these often provide legal coverage for depositions. This is primarily because the outcome of the deposition may include having you named as a defendant in a professional liability or negligence lawsuit or having disciplinary charges filed against you.

One of the first things you should do if you receive a subpoena or a notice of a deposition is to contact your professional liability insurance carrier and see if it will pay for an attorney to represent you. For example, Healthcare Providers Service Organization (HPSO), CPH & Associates, Nurses Service Organization (NSO), Dentists Advantage and many other malpractice insurance companies provide excellent deposition coverage.

The second thing you should do is to call an experienced attorney and schedule a consultation. Even if you cannot afford to retain the services of the attorney for the actual deposition, a consultation may assist you in properly preparing.

Consult With A Health Law Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Pharmacists and Pharmacies.

We routinely provide deposition coverage to pharmacists, pharmacies and other health professionals being deposed in criminal cases, negligence cases, civil cases or disciplinary cases involving other health professionals.

The lawyers of The Health Law Firm are experienced in both formal and informal administrative hearings and in representing physicians, physician assistants and other health professionals in investigations and at Board of Pharmacy hearings. Call now or visit our website www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Have you ever had an informal or formal hearing before the Board of Pharmacy? What was the experience like? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Florida Legislature Reforms Pharmacy Benefit Manager Audit Practices

1 Indest-2008-1According to the Florida Legislature, it’s time for pharmacists to focus on their patients instead of paperwork. On June 13, 2014, Florida Governor Rick Scott signed Florida Senate Bill 702 into law. This law introduces clear guidelines of acceptable audit practices of pharmacies in the Sunshine State.

There are more than 2,700 pharmacies across Florida that are routinely evaluated by Pharmacy Benefit Managers (PBMs). The purpose of these audits is to verify that certain claims are submitted and handled properly. If a PBM audit uncovers fraud or abuse, the pharmacy will be subject to penalties, including reimbursement of amounts paid. With the increase of rules regulating pharmacies, these audits have progressively become more time consuming for pharmacists.

Florida SB 702 becomes effective on October 1, 2014. To read a summary of the law, click here.

What’s the Need of the New Law?

In the United States, a PBM is most often a third party administrator of prescription drug programs. The PBM is primarily responsible for processing and paying prescription drug claims.
Currently, PBMs have broad discretion to penalize pharmacies. This means that pharmacies can be forced to pay thousands of dollars as the result of basic clerical or typographical mistakes, many of which are not the fault of the pharmacist or pharmacy staff. This law was enacted to provide reasonable standards for pharmacy audits while allowing PBMs to continue penalizing for true fraud and abuse.

Pharmacy Rights Included in New Law.

SB 702 makes common-sense auditing standards that include:

-    At least seven days advance notice before an on-site audit is conducted;
–    On-site audits scheduled after the first three days of the month;
–    A limit on the audit period of 24 months after the date claim is submitted;
–    Audits requiring clinical judgment must be conducted by or with a pharmacist;
–    Use of written practitioner records to validate pharmacy records in accordance with state and federal law;
–    Reimbursement of claims retroactively denied for clerical, typographical or computer errors unless pharmacy has a pattern of fraudulent billing;
–    Delivery of initial audit reports to pharmacists within 120 days after an audit is completed;
–    Receipt of final audit report within six months of the preliminary report;
–    Allowing 10 days for pharmacists to provide documentation to address any discrepancies found during an audit;
–    Prohibiting the use of extrapolations in auditing claims; and
–    The Office of Insurance Regulation will study pharmacy complaints of willful violations of audit provisions by PBMs.

Stipulation of Rights.

The rights listed above do not apply to audits that are based on suspicions of fraud or willful misrepresentation; audits of claims paid for by federally funded programs; or concurrent reviews or desk audits that occur within three business days after transmission where no chargeback or recoupment is demanded.

An entity that audits a pharmacy located within a Health Care Fraud Prevention and Enforcement Action Team Task Force area designated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) is not required to provide seven days prior notice of an audit if the pharmacy has been a member of a credentialed provider network for less than 12 months.

What This Means for You.

For once there is a new law that does not make a pharmacist’s job more complicated. This law may actually alleviate some of the stress that comes with dealing with an audit. We’re hoping with the implementation of this law pharmacists will be able to spend more time focusing on patient care.

Comments?

What do you think of this new law? Will it affect your pharmacy? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA, DOH and FDA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Out-of-State Compounding Pharmacies May Need a Permit To Do Business in Florida

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

Beginning on October 1, 2014, out-of-state compounding pharmacies may be required to hold a compounded sterile product permit. That’s because the Regulated Industries Committee of the Florida Senate voted on March 13, 2014, to approve a bill increasing the restrictions on out-of-state compounding pharmacies that ship medications into Florida. These increased regulations would apply to around 300 compounding pharmacies shipping medicine to Florida.

The bill was introduced to increase standards for compounding pharmacies that create medications that are tailored to the needs of individual patients. Currently the bill is out for reference review. Considering that this is a hot issue in Florida and nationally, we expect the bill to pass.

Click here to read the entire bill.

Requirements Under the New Bill.

The bill requires out-of-state compounding pharmacies to hold a compounded sterile product permit to ship medications into Florida. Applications for the permit would be provided by the Board of Pharmacy. The bill also requires pharmacies to meet or exceed Florida’s sterile compounding standards. Under the bill, the Florida Department of Health (DOH) is responsible for inspecting out-of-state compounding pharmacies for compliance. The DOH would hold the authority to punish or revoke an out-of-state compounding pharmacy’s license for noncompliance. The pharmacy would be responsible for reimbursing the cost of the inspection.

If the bill passes, compounding pharmacies already shipping compounded sterile products into Florida may continue to do so, as long as the pharmacy receives a permit before January 31, 2015.

Permit Law for Florida Pharmacies that Compound Sterile Products.

Similarly, the Florida Board of Pharmacy promulgated a rule requiring a permit for pharmacies that compound sterile products in Florida. Effective September 23, 2013, Rule 64B16-28.100(8), Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.), requires most pharmacies that engage in the preparation of sterile compounded products in Florida to obtain a Special Sterile Compounding Permit.

Click here to read more on this permit.

New Standards Most Likely Triggered by Tainted Compounded Medications.

These new standards are being implemented after a nationwide outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to contaminated drugs made by a compounding pharmacy in Massachusetts. Florida is no stranger to allegations of tainted compounded products. In May 2012, Franck’s pharmacy in Ocala, Florida, was accused of distributing eye medications that contained a fungal infection. Click here for the first blog and here for the second blog.

It’s likely these new permits are a direct result of the recent issues with compounded medications and compounding pharmacies. The goal of these permits is to help authorities, such as the DOH and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), track pharmacies compounding sterile products.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA, DOH and FDA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of the bill to increase restrictions on out-of-state compounding pharmacies that ship medications into Florida? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

The News Service of Florida. “Pharmacy Bill, FL Budge Taking Shape.” WUSF News. (March 14, 2014). From: http://wusfnews.wusf.usf.edu/post/pharmacy-bill-fl-budget-taking-shape

Palombo, Jessica. “After Federal Compounding Pharmacy Crackdown, Fla. Panel Passes Extra Restrictions.” WFSU News. (February 12, 2014). From: http://news.wfsu.org/post/after-federal-compounding-pharmacy-crackdown-fla-panel-passes-extra-restrictions

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

 

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Board of Pharmacy Updates Record Retention Rules for Pharmacies

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

At its meeting held on February 12, 2014, the Florida Board of Pharmacy voted to approve language changes to a number of rules. Specifically, those changes were put into effect to establish a uniform four-year retention policy for pharmacy records.

Previously the Board’s rules were not consistent with respect to how long pharmacies were required to retain different types of records.

When approving new rules or changes to existing rules, administrative bodies are required to evaluate the regulatory costs of the changes. In examining these costs the Board found that any financial costs imposed upon small businesses would be balanced by the efficiencies created by a uniform retention period.

Board of Pharmacy Voted to Change the Wording in These Rules.

Below is a list of the administrative rules that were changed:

- Standards for the Approval of Registered Pharmacy Technician Training Programs
Rule 64B16-26.351, Florida Administrative Code

- Standards for Approval of Courses and Providers
Rule 64B16-26.601, Florida Administrative Code

- Continuing Education Records Requirements
Rule 64B16-26.603, Florida Administrative Code

- General Terms and Conditions to be Followed by a Pharmacist When Ordering and Dispensing Approved Medicinal Drug Products
Rule 64B16-27.210, Florida Administrative Code

- Standards of Practice – Continuous Quality Improvement Program
Rule 64B16-27.300, Florida Administrative Code

- Requirement for Patient Records
Rule 64B16-27.800, Florida Administrative Code

- Change of Ownership
Rule 64B16-28.2021, Florida Administrative Code

- Centralized Prescription Filling, Delivering and Returning
Rule 64B16-28.450, Florida Administrative Code

- Transmission of Starter Dose Prescriptions for Patients in Class I Institutional or Modified II B Facilities
Rule 64B16-28.503, Florida Administrative Code

- Class II Institutional Pharmacies
Rule 64B16-28.605, Florida Administrative Code

- Remote Medication Order Processing for Class II Institutional Pharmacies
Rule 64B16-28.606, Florida Administrative Code

- Automated Pharmacy System – Long-Term Care, hospice, and Prison
Rule 64B16-28.607, Florida Administrative Code

- Modified Class II Institutional Pharmacies
Rule 64B16-28.702, Florida Administrative Code

- Record Maintenance for Animal Shelter Permits
Rule 64B16-29.0041, Florida Administrative Code

Make Sure Your Facility is Prepared.

While these rule changes are not final, it is important to recognize if they will be affecting your facility. You should also be making arrangements in your facility to ensure that there is enough computer disk space or physical space to retain these records. Keep in mind that these records retention rules are in addition to any others imposed by other Florida or federal statutes or rules relating to controlled substances or other pharmacy practices.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

How do you feel about the requirement of pharmacy records to be retained for four years? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Florida Board of Pharmacy Approves Change to Destruction of Controlled Substances Rule

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

At its meeting held in Orlando, Florida, on February 12, 2014, the Florida Board of Pharmacy approved final changes to Rule 64B16-28.303, Florida Administrative Code. This rule governs the destruction of controlled substances by Class II Institutional Pharmacies.

The focus of the new rule changes is to ensure that either the prescription department manager (PDM) or the consultant pharmacist of record signs off on all destruction of controlled substances. Further, the rule requires that a copy of the destruction documents be mailed to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) within one business day of destruction.

According to the Board’s statement, the purpose of the rule change is to make it “easier to properly dispose of [controlled] substances while ensuring that one of the persons signing for the destruction always is either the prescription department manager or the consultant pharmacist of record, and that a copy of the destruction is timely sent to the DEA.”

Who the Rule Applies To.

Although this rule applies to all permittees, pharmacists in Class II institutional pharmacies need to be aware that the Board’s clarifications were specifically aimed at those facilities. In case you are not sure whether you work in a Class II pharmacy, those facilities are defined as pharmacies which “employ the services of a registered pharmacist or pharmacists who, in practicing institutional pharmacy, [] provide dispensing and consulting services on the premises to patients of that institution, for use on the premises of that institution.” Section 465.019(b), Florida Statutes.

More Details of the Rule.

The new rule also states that destruction shall be conducted by at least two people. One will be the PDM or the consulting pharmacist of record and the other has to be one of the following: the medical director of the facility or his/her physician designee; the director of nursing or his/her licensed nurse designee, or a sworn law enforcement officer.

Finally, the rule retains the ability of the pharmacy to destroy the drugs by way of sending them to a reverse distributor in lieu of on-site destruction.

Check our blog regularly for updates on this and other recently adopted rules and changes.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of this rule change? Will the change affect your job or business? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.