DEA Offers New Prescription Drug Return Policy

3 Indest-2009-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Looking to improve the prescription drug abuse epidemic in the United States, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) announced September 8, 2014, that it would permit patients to return their unused prescription medications to pharmacies. This new rule, covering all types of prescription drugs, will give patients the option of mailing unused prescriptions to an authorized collector using packaging provided by the pharmacy.

Hopefully this will help to eliminate many of the problematic situations that pharmacists and physicians found themselves in when they accumulated returned or unused medications from patients for destruction.

This move intends to address the rising number of injuries and deaths associated with controlled substance drugs, particularly opioids. Reducing the stockpile of unneeded prescription drugs from American homes will limit teenagers’ accessibility to their parents’ medications and reduce burglaries for such substances. According to The New York Times, this demographic is known to be the most prevalent abuser of such controlled substances.

To read the full story from The New York Times, click here.

Prior Methods of Prescription Drug Disposal.

Under the Controlled Substances Act, patients were only allowed to dispose of unused drugs themselves or surrender them to law enforcement. Personal disposal of controlled substances typically means flushing pills down a toilet or throwing them in the trash. Because this can pose a risk toward animals and clean drinking water, these methods are frowned upon by environmentalists and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

Drug “take back” programs are another option when it comes to disposing of unused prescription drugs. These events are organized by the DEA and are held twice a year at local police departments across the country. During these programs, citizens can anonymously drop off any unused prescription drugs. According to The Wall Street Journal, the Department of Justice (DOJ) reported that a nationwide event in April 2014 brought in 390 tons of prescription drugs at more than 6,000 sites. In the past four years, these collection events have removed from circulation more than 4.1 million pounds of prescription medication from across the country.

Although these events prove successful, many healthcare professionals are optimistic for the bigger impact the pharmacy “take back” programs may have. Providing consumers convenient year-round access to medication disposals will be positive reinforcement to regularly dispose of unused prescription medications. This method is believed to be more likely to accomplish the mission of shrinking the pool of unused and potentially fatal controlled substances in American homes.

To read the full article from The Wall Street Journal, click here.

Ironing Out Details of the New Plan.

There are many logistics to consider to ensure these pharmaceutical “take back” programs will be successful. The programs will not be mandatory, as the decision to take part will be the under the sole discretion of each company. The pharmacies must voluntarily choose to register with the DEA in order to start receiving the leftover prescriptions. In the past, pharmacies have not generally wanted to accept the hassle of offering such a program. However, the DEA expects many pharmacies to jump on the bandwagon to showcase good-faith effort of keeping drugs out of the wrong hands.

DEA-approved organizations collecting the unused drugs will include hospital pharmacies, narcotic treatment programs, and companies contracted by other collectors to destroy controlled substances.

There are concerns circling the initiative. Some pharmacies do not have the resources required to accommodate incinerators, thus limiting the locations available to consumers. In addition, professionals are concerned with the lack of regulations listed in the new plan. There are no set requirements on how the prescriptions should be destroyed. The rules simply mandate that the drugs are altered into a permanent, irreversible state.

The burden of payment has also not been discussed or outlined in the new plan. Who will cover the cost of packaging and disposal has yet to be decided. Also, to be considered is the challenge of keeping the returned prescriptions safe until destruction. An unsecured, unmonitored return site containing stock piles of addictive drugs would be a gold mine for many addicts and criminals. Should a theft occur at one of these drop-off receptacles, who would be held liable? The American Pharmacists Association has already expressed concern of pharmacy legal liability.

The biggest obstacle of all, however, may be convincing the general public that returning unused pills is a necessary moral obligation.

Comments?

Would you participate in this type of prescription drug return program? As a pharmacist or someone who works at a pharmacy, what are your concerns with this take back program? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Consult With A Health Law Attorney Experienced in the Representation of Pharmacists and Pharmacies.

We routinely provide deposition coverage to pharmacists, pharmacies and other health professionals being deposed in criminal cases, negligence cases, civil cases or disciplinary cases involving other health professionals. We can review business referral arrangements and provide legal counsel on whether they are not in violation of federal and state anti-referral laws. The lawyers of The Health Law Firm are experienced in both formal and informal administrative hearings and in representing physicians, physician assistants and other health professionals in investigations and at Board of Pharmacy hearings.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Sources:

Barrett, Devlin. “U.S. to Allow Pharmacies to Take Back Unused Prescription Drugs.” The Wall Street Journal. (September 08, 2014). From: http://online.wsj.com/articles/u-s-to-allow-pharmacies-to-take-back-unused-prescription-drugs-1410186602

Saint Louis, Catherine. “D.E.A. to Allow Return of Unused Pills to Pharmacies.” The New York Times. (September 08, 2014). From: http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/09/health/unused-pills-return-to-pharmacies.html?_r=0

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

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Florida Board of Pharmacy Approves Change to Destruction of Controlled Substances Rule

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

At its meeting held in Orlando, Florida, on February 12, 2014, the Florida Board of Pharmacy approved final changes to Rule 64B16-28.303, Florida Administrative Code. This rule governs the destruction of controlled substances by Class II Institutional Pharmacies.

The focus of the new rule changes is to ensure that either the prescription department manager (PDM) or the consultant pharmacist of record signs off on all destruction of controlled substances. Further, the rule requires that a copy of the destruction documents be mailed to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) within one business day of destruction.

According to the Board’s statement, the purpose of the rule change is to make it “easier to properly dispose of [controlled] substances while ensuring that one of the persons signing for the destruction always is either the prescription department manager or the consultant pharmacist of record, and that a copy of the destruction is timely sent to the DEA.”

Who the Rule Applies To.

Although this rule applies to all permittees, pharmacists in Class II institutional pharmacies need to be aware that the Board’s clarifications were specifically aimed at those facilities. In case you are not sure whether you work in a Class II pharmacy, those facilities are defined as pharmacies which “employ the services of a registered pharmacist or pharmacists who, in practicing institutional pharmacy, [] provide dispensing and consulting services on the premises to patients of that institution, for use on the premises of that institution.” Section 465.019(b), Florida Statutes.

More Details of the Rule.

The new rule also states that destruction shall be conducted by at least two people. One will be the PDM or the consulting pharmacist of record and the other has to be one of the following: the medical director of the facility or his/her physician designee; the director of nursing or his/her licensed nurse designee, or a sworn law enforcement officer.

Finally, the rule retains the ability of the pharmacy to destroy the drugs by way of sending them to a reverse distributor in lieu of on-site destruction.

Check our blog regularly for updates on this and other recently adopted rules and changes.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think of this rule change? Will the change affect your job or business? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.

Copyright © 1996-2014 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Central Florida Doctor’s Home and Offices Raided Over Alleged Improper Prescribing Practices

4 Indest-2009-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

In a joint operation, law enforcement officials raided the home and two offices of a Central Florida physician on November 8, 2013, according to the Osceola County Sheriff’s Office. The Osceola County Sheriff’s Office alleges that the doctor is being investigated for improper prescribing practices. According to the press release, this is not the first time the physician has been under investigation.

The raid was a collective effort between the Osceola County Investigative Bureau (OCIB), Florida Department of Health (DOH), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Florida Department of Law Enforcement (FDLE), and the Metropolitan Bureau of Investigation (MBI).

Physician Not Arrested After Raid.

On November 8, 2013, law enforcement agents searched the physician’s home and his offices in Kissimmee, Florida and Orlando, Florida. The Florida DOH also issued an emergency order restricting the doctor’s privilege to prescribe narcotics. The physician was not arrested.

The physician was allegedly the target of two separate Florida DOH complaints in June 2013. Both complaints alleged the physician wrote prescriptions for painkillers to patients who did not have a medical need for the drugs. Click here to read the two previous complaints.

Doctor Previously Blacklisted by CVS.

According to an Orlando Sentinel article, this physician was previously placed on a CVS document referred to as the “blacklist.” This list identifies Central Florida’s top physicians prescribing oxycodone. When the list was released, the pharmacy chain notified the physicians that CVS pharmacists would no longer fill their patients’ prescriptions. This blacklist was an effort by CVS to step up internal efforts to combat the nation’s prescription drug abuse epidemic. So far, CVS has released two blacklists, one was released in November 2011, and the second list was released in August 2013. You can read more about the two lists on our blog. Click here for part one, and click here for part two.

To read the Orlando Sentinel article, click here.

Florida Losing War on Prescription Drug Abuse.

Despite the aggressive “war on prescription drugs” the Sunshine State reportedly ranks eleventh highest nationally in drug overdose deaths.

I have represented a number of physicians who have been accused of “overprescribing.” Some of these were criminal investigations by local law enforcement authorities, such as a county sheriff’s office. Some were investigations by the DEA. Some were investigations by the state licensing agency such as the Florida DOH. To read a previous blog, “Legal Tips for Physicians to Manage Pain Patients,” click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Do you think Florida’s war on prescription drug abuse is working? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Lizasuain, Twis. “Dr. Ibem Borges Investigated for Over Prescribing Drugs.” Osceola County Sheriff’s Public and Medica Relations. (November 8, 2013).

Pavuk, Amy. “Agents Raid Home, Offices of Central Florida Physician Suspected of Improper Prescribing Practices.” Orlando Sentinel. (November 8, 2013). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/local/breakingnews/os-doctor-ibem-borges-raid-20131108,0,735835.story

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Two Florida Doctors Convicted of Money Laundering Stemming from Pill Mill Operation in Broward and Palm Beach Counties

1 Indest-2008-1By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

Two South Florida doctors faced life in prison and fines up to $2 million each because nine (9) of their patients allegedly died of drug overdoses, according to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). However, on July 30, 2013, a jury acquitted Cynthia Cadet, M.D., and Joseph Castronuovo, M.D., of causing the deaths of their patients. The doctors were convicted of money laundering for their role in a conspiracy involving the chain of pain clinics they worked at, according to the DEA. The doctors still face up to ten (10) years in jail for the money laundering charges, as well as forfeiture of the money made while working at the clinics. Sentencing for the doctors is set for November 4, 2013, according to the DEA.

Click here to read the press release from the DEA.

The two doctors were arrested as part of a four (4) year operation targeting a string of South Florida pain clinics. The operation, also known as “Oxy Alley,” resulted in racketeering charges against 32 people in 2010.

Defense Attorneys Argued Doctors Appropriately Examined and Diagnosed Patients.

In the case against the two doctors, prosecutors depicted the pain management clinics where the two doctors worked to be pill mills for addicts. According to an article on Reuters, prosecutors stated that addicts and distributors would come from all over the country and pay cash to be prescribed hundreds of prescription pills at a time.

Defense attorneys argued both doctors were unaware of the conspiracy and were practicing medicine in line with state standards, which allows licensed physicians to distribute opioid pain pills without fear of punishment. An expert on pain management testified that specifically Dr. Cadet’s files showed no evidence of misconduct

According to Reuters, the two clinics where the doctors worked disbursed more than 20 million oxycodone tablets between 2008 and 2010.

To read the entire article from Reuters, click here.

Legal Tips to Manage Pain Patients.

I have represented a number of physicians who have been accused of “overprescribing.” Some of these were criminal investigations by local law enforcement authorities, such as a county sheriff’s office. Some were investigations by the DEA. Some were investigations by the state licensing agency such as the Florida Department of Health (DOH).

In several cases the investigation began when the patient died of a drug overdose (in several of these cases it was unclear whether it was a suicide by the patient or an accidental overdose). In each of these cases, there was an angry, upset family member who blamed the physicians for the patient’s death. In each case, the physician I represented had no idea what the patient was going to do.

Anytime there is a death that may have been drug related, local law enforcement authorities will usually do a thorough investigation and will usually seize any prescription medications for the patient that they can find. This may result in the prescribing physician becoming the target of a homicide investigation.

To read a previous blog listing some ideas on how physicians might protect themselves from drug-seeking patients, click here.

Florida Ranks Eleventh in Nation for Prescription Drug Abuse Deaths.

Despite the aggressive “war on prescription drugs,” the stings on pill mills and Florida’s prescription drug monitoring program, the Sunshine State reportedly ranks eleventh highest nationally in drug overdose deaths. According to an article in the Orlando Sentinel, in 1999, the number of drug-overdose deaths, most from prescription drugs, was 6.4 deaths per 100,000 Florida residents. In 2013, that number is reportedly 16.4 deaths per 100,000 Florida residents.

According to the Orlando Sentinel, states were ranked by investigating ten (10) different strategies that appear effective in curbing prescription drug abuse. Florida was found to be using seven (7) of the ten (10) strategies. The article did not list the strategies that were reviewed.

Click here to read the entire article from the Orlando Sentinel.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with DEA Cases.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm are experienced in handling DEA cases. If you are currently being investigated or facing other adverse action by the DEA contact one of our attorneys by calling (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001. You can also visit our website for more information at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Do you think Florida’s war on prescription drug abuse is working? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Jameson, Marni. “Florida Ranks 11th in Nation for Prescription-Drug Abuse Death.” Orlando Sentinel. (October 10, 2013). From: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/features/blogs/vital-signs/os-prescription-drug-abuse-florida,0,2078034.post

Drug Enforcement Administration. “Jury Convicts Two Doctors of Conspiracy to Commit Money Laundering Resulting from Pill Mill Operation in Broward and Palm Beach Counties.” Drug Enforcement Administration. (August 1, 2013). From: http://www.justice.gov/dea/divisions/mia/2013/mia080113a.shtml

Fagenson, Zachary. “Florida Pain Doctors Convicted of Money Laundering.” Reuters. (July 30, 2013). From: http://www.reuters.com/article/2013/07/31/us-florida-pillmills-doctors-idUSBRE96U01D20130731

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

“Operation Main Pain” Targets More Than 60 in Fraudulent Prescription Drug Ring

PS 3 Indest-2009-2By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

The Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office announced a fraudulent prescription drug ring bust that spanned throughout Sarasota and Manatee counties in Florida, on September 19, 2013. So far, 61 people, including the alleged ringleader have been arrested. The operation has been dubbed “Operation Main Pain” by the Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office.

Click here to view the press release from the Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office.

Investigation Unveiled Complex Fraudulent Drug Ring.

The investigation began in July 2011, when a fraudulent oxycodone prescription was noticed at a CVS pharmacy in Sarasota County. When more of the same fake prescriptions were presented at the CVS pharmacy, the prescriptions were identified as suspicious and declined, according to the Bradenton Herald.

Investigators uncovered that the fraudulent prescription drug ring involved several recruiters who employed runners to enter into pharmacies multiple times a day with identical prescriptions. The recruiters had runners fill fake prescriptions primarily at two pharmacies, one in Venice, Florida, and one in Sarasota, Florida.

According to the Bradenton Herald, detectives say the ringleader wrote 220 phony prescriptions that were exchanged for nearly 20,000 oxycodone pills.

To read the Bradenton Herald article, click here.

Charges Against Those Involved Include Trafficking.

According to the Herald-Tribune, the arrests have been ongoing for two years, with the latest arrests made as recently as September 2013. The ringleader is charged with conspiracy to traffic in oxycodone. The other 60 people arrested face multiple counts of obtaining oxycodone by fraud and trafficking charges.

Sarasota Sheriff Expresses Disappointment in Two Main Pharmacies Accused of Filling Fake Prescriptions.

The two pharmacies targeted by the drug ring allegedly filled more than 100 of the fraudulent prescriptions in a short amount of time. According to the Herald-Tribune, the Sarasota Sheriff’s Office works to educate pharmacies to notice warning signs. The sheriff stated that the pharmacies should have notified the authorities since there were hundreds of similar prescriptions, being brought in by similar customers, all allegedly written by the same doctor. According to the Herald-Tribune, the pharmacies are currently being investigated.

Click here to read the article from the Herald-Tribune.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced in Representing Pharmacies and Pharmacists.

The Health Law Firm represents pharmacists and pharmacies in DEA investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, administrative hearings, inspections and audits. The firm’s attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

Given the information in the blog, do you think the two main pharmacies that were filling the fraudulent prescriptions should have notified the authorities? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Rose, Wendy. “Operation Main Pain Includes 61 Arrests.” Sarasota County Sheriff’s Office. (September 19, 2013). From: http://www.sarasotasheriff.org/press_detail.asp?R=13-182

Johnson, Elizabeth. “More Than 60 Arrested in Drug Fraud Ring.” Herald-Tribune. (September 19, 2013). From: http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20130919/ARTICLE/130919529?tc=ar

Bradenton Herald. “61 Charged with Prescription Drug Fraud in Manatee, Sarasota.” Bradenton Herald. (September 19, 2013). From: http://www.bradenton.com/2013/09/19/4726950/61-charged-with-prescription-drug.html

About the Author:  George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law.  He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice.  Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area.  www.TheHealthLawFirm.com  The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone:  (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

Crackdown in the Supply of Prescription Medications Drive Floridians to Heroin

4 Indest-2009-3By George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law

For the past three years, Florida lawmakers and officials have waged war against prescription drug abuse. At the peak of the pill abuse epidemic, seven people a day reportedly died of a prescription drug overdose in Florida. As the Sunshine State became known as painkiller capital of America, officials worked quickly to enact legislation against prescription drugs, develop and monitor the statewide prescription drug monitoring database, and crackdown on prescription drug abusers and pill mills. Flash forward to summer 2013, prescription pills are harder to come by and more expensive, therefore making them less appealing to addicts. However, that does not mean the war is over. Now addicts are finding their replacement fix in heroin, according to the Miami Herald.

Click here to read the entire article from The Miami Herald.

Oxycodone-Related Deaths Down, While Heroin Numbers Rise in Florida.

According to the Florida Department of Law Enforcement’s (FDLE) semi-annual report, oxycodone-related deaths dropped statewide between January and June of 2012, compared to the same period of time in 2011. I previously wrote a blog on the decline of oxycodone-related deaths in Florida. To read that blog, click here.

Now that oxycodone-related deaths are down, heroin numbers are on the rise. According to the Florida Medical Examiners Commission, from July 2010 to June 2011, there were 45 heroin-related deaths statewide. From July 2011 to June 2012, the number jumped to 77 heroin-related deaths. The FDLE is seeing the same trend. In the first three months of 2013, heroin-related charges totaled 948 and in the same three months in 2012, that number was 772.

Florida Officials Try to Fight Heroin.

Lawmakers took dramatic actions to reduce the supply of prescription drugs on the streets. According to the Miami Herald, lawmakers are now trying to fight heroin before it takes off.

Broward County’s substance abuse commission and the Sanford-Brown Institute hosted a workshop to share the news about the growing heroin trend. The commission’s board of governors has formed a task force to put together an anti-heroin campaign. The group is also publicizing the 911 Good Samaritan Act. This Act protects callers from prosecution for possessing or ingesting low-level controlled substances under some circumstances.

The Ultimate Results of Such Crackdowns.

The war on prescription drug abuse took away the supply, but not the demand. Since the crackdown we have seen the largest legitimate pharmacy chains in the state and nation not allowed to fill prescriptions for painkillers. Click here to read a blog on a Walgreens distribution center that was served with an immediate suspension order from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). To read a blog on the DEA pulling the controlled substance licenses from two Central Florida CVS pharmacies.

This has left some patients in dire straits. They are suffering because they cannot locate a pharmacy to fill their legitimate pain medicine prescriptions. These include injured military veterans, patients who are 100% disabled and on disability or social security, patients injured in automobile accidents and job-related accidents (whose medications are paid for by insurance, if they can find a pharmacy to fill it) and others with real chronic pain issues.

Contact Experienced Health Law Attorneys.

The Health Law Firm routinely represents pharmacists, pharmacies, physicians, nurses and other health providers in investigations, regulatory matters, licensing issues, litigation, inspections and audits involving the DEA, Department of Health (DOH) and other law enforcement agencies. Its attorneys include those who are board certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law as well as licensed health professionals who are also attorneys.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Comments?

What do you think about the increase in heroin use? Is one drug more dangerous than another? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Burch, Audra. “As Pill Mills Fade Away, Heroin Fills the Void.” The Miami Herald. (May 11, 2013). From: http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/05/11/3392908/as-prescription-pills-fade-heroin.html

Gillen, Michele. “Dangerous Drug Creating New Addicts.” WBFS. (May 22, 2013). From: http://miami.cbslocal.com/2013/05/22/dangerous-drug-creating-new-addicts/

About the Author: George F. Indest III, J.D., M.P.A., LL.M., is Board Certified by The Florida Bar in Health Law. He is the President and Managing Partner of The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Ave., Altamonte Springs, FL 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

“The Health Law Firm” is a registered fictitious business name of George F. Indest III, P.A. – The Health Law Firm, a Florida professional service corporation, since 1999.
Copyright © 1996-2012 The Health Law Firm. All rights reserved.

California, Pennsylvania and Kentucky Move to Tighten Laws Related to Controlled Substance

Lance Leider headshotBy Lance O. Leider, J.D., The Health Law Firm

In reports from both coasts, three states have recently made moves to tighten monitoring and prescribing of controlled substances. Legislators in California, Pennsylvania and Kentucky are contemplating new actions. Health professionals should take note, these prescription drug monitoring programs can, and will be, used as a prosecution tool.

Details of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program Possibly Coming to Your State.

According to the Los Angeles Times, California is looking to utilize its prescription drug monitoring program CURES to find physicians who are a little too loose with the prescription pad. Lawmakers are contemplating mining the data compiled by CURES to find physicians who are overprescribing and take action against them. Click here to read the entire Los Angeles Times article.

The Pennsylvania house recently forwarded a bill from committee to the floor for a final vote. The bill would establish a monitoring program like those in California, Florida and Kentucky. This monitoring program would be used to combat abuse and doctor shopping by identifying patients that have already received an adequate supply of medications.

Kentucky, already the home of some tough prescription drug laws, is looking to fine tune its regulatory scheme. According to The Courier-Journal, the new bill would clarify existing regulations by providing medical exemptions for patients that would otherwise be wrapped up in the enforcement provisions. To learn more on the proposed changes to Kentucky’s prescription drug laws, click here.

Most States Looking into Prescription Drug Monitoring Programs.

Lawmakers in all three states cited laws and regulations from other states as inspiration for the moves to consider new laws to monitor prescriptions of controlled substances. What this means is that whatever state you may be in, you should be aware that lawmakers are looking around the country at what works and are implementing similar programs and laws in their governments.

Databases Can Be Used as a Prosecution Tool.

Enforcement of drug laws and prescribing regulations has been ever increasing in recent years. The implementation of these databases and corresponding regulations are going to provide more tools for law enforcement and state medical boards to crack down on physicians. In order to avoid trouble it is crucial that you take time to review your state’s prescribing and record keeping laws with an experienced health care attorney.

From experience, we have seen the database in Florida used mostly as a tool for prosecution of pain management physicians and pharmacists. Even in cases where the pharmacist has been the one to notify the authorities of suspected forged prescriptions and where the pharmacist has cooperated in prosecuting the criminals, I have seen this database cited as evidence against him or her. I do not believe this is what the legislation intended. Physicians and pharmacists should consider using whatever database is implemented in their respective states, or otherwise remaining vigilant to avoid being labeled an overprescriber.

To read legal tips to manage pain patients, click here.

Contact Health Law Attorneys Experienced with Investigations of Health Professionals and Providers.

The attorneys of The Health Law Firm provide legal representation to physicians, nurses, nurse practitioners, CRNAs, pain management doctors, dentists, pharmacists, psychologists and other health providers in Department of Health (DOH) investigations, Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) investigations, FBI investigations, Medicare investigations, Medicaid investigations and other types of investigations of health professionals and providers.

To contact The Health Law Firm, please call (407) 331-6620 or (850) 439-1001 and visit our website at www.TheHealthLawFirm.com.

Opinions?

Does the state where you are located have a prescription drug monitoring program? Is it similar to any of programs we mentioned in this blog? What do you think of these programs? Are they necessary? Please leave any thoughtful comments below.

Sources:

Girion, Lisa and Glover, Scott. “Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris Urges Funding for Prescription Tracking.” Los Angeles Times. (March 3, 2013). From: http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2013/03/attorney-general-kamala-harris-funding-prescription-database-.html

Wynn, Mike. “Kentucky Legislature Overhauls Prescription Drug Law.” The Courier-Journal. (March 4, 2013). From: http://www.courier-journal.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=2013303040093&nclick_check=1

Associated Press. “Lawmakers Mull Prescription Drug Monitoring.” Associated Press. (March 4, 2013). From: http://meadvilletribune.com/local/x986702017/Lawmakers-mull-prescription-drug-monitoring

About the Author: Lance O. Leider is an attorney with The Health Law Firm, which has a national practice. Its main office is in the Orlando, Florida, area. www.TheHealthLawFirm.com The Health Law Firm, 1101 Douglas Avenue, Altamonte Springs, Florida 32714, Phone: (407) 331-6620.

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